Bread made out of SALTWATER

Algea

Today is a gathering by Kinfolk in Berlin and I am sharing my bread with them. The theme is Ocean. For The Bread Exchange, this is probably the easiest theme they could have picked. All my breads are already inspired by the ocean.

You can discribe my bread baking like this:

I use flour and sourdough. And then I add Saltwater. 

That’s it. 

As you know, I like to keep my bread simple. Adding inspiration to the bread is nice, but to add too much taste into a really well made bread always feel a bit sad since you loose the chance to taste the actual bread. I just simply feel more excited when the bread reaches perfection through its simplicity.

And this is why I like to play with the crust.

Because the crust is like a palette to paint on. And still keeps the crumb nice a pure.

So when I got the assignment to make an ocean inspired bread I decided to make a very simple white bread wrapped in Seaweed. Simple. I am going to use a white flour which is a mix of a Swedish (Småland) and a German (Saxony) flour.

I bake my bread with a salt content which is the same as the ocean itself (usually between 3,5-3,8%). And I try to stick to the salt content in the ocean where the salt was collected.

On saturday I will be baking with a Salt which I traded with a saltmaker from Iceland, Nordur Salt. His salt, and salt making process, is as pure as it can be. The water in the protected area in the north west part of Iceland has a salt percentage of 3%.

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add on from May 20th:

I have received some mails asking where to get the salt in Germany. As usual, I like to recommend Goldhahn & Sampson since I just really appreciate the people behind the shop. So here you find a link to order the salt.

Nordur

 

 

ElmlidBread made out of SALTWATER

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